You don’t REALLY know that move…

I am in a group class, secretly feeling pretty cocky because I just nailed the pattern the instructor taught. I continue practicing it on my own until I see the instructor making a beeline for me.

He stops me. And inside 30 seconds, tells me the 5 things I was doing completely wrong. To be fair, he conveyed this kindly as “corrections and adjustments”, but I immediately realized I had made some serious assumptions regarding how well I was doing that move.

Lesson learned: There’s a huge difference between doing a move and doing it correctly

Truly learning a move means that I can do it with correct technique so it feels good to my partner and is properly executed. It means doing it while sustaining correct posture, body mechanics, balance, timing, connection, aesthetics and lead/follow technique. It means it doesn’t fall apart when I add expression, musicality and a room of dancers around me. It also means I can lead/follow it with a variety of body types/sizes, skill levels and abilities.

That’s a hell of a lot stuff. 

Until I started learning technique, I had no idea how detailed it truly is. There is a huge difference between the “technique” taught in the group class and the TECHNIQUE I am learning in private lessons. It also explains why I never look like the instructor when I do the move.

My delusions of technique used to lead to me proudly proclaim, “I can follow anything!”. Being able to “follow” versus “dance as a follower” is like the difference between, “I can walk!” and being able to walk on a tightrope while knitting.

It is not the same skill set. 

For me, it means the difference between being able to “dance” and being able to dance tango (or west coast swing, blues, etc.). Technique is what empowers me to do a specific dance correctly, effectively and * ahem * – enjoyably for my partner.

As a follower, I can’t be a passive participant. I can’t expect the lead to do all the work. And I know leads who take every class and still get turned down by good dancers. Don’t hate me for saying this but… it’s more than going through the motions of the pattern and expecting our partner to “do their part”.

Both roles must actively contribute more than just the surface level motions. There are underlying mechanics that make a huge difference in our dancing. 

I knew an instructor who ended every class with, “If you liked the moves we taught today and want to learn the technique necessary to do this on the social floor, talk to us about private lessons or come join us at our practica”.

They emphasized that the class was only the start of learning a move. There is still much more to learn before taking it the social floor.

We rarely realize how much we don’t know. We often assume we are at a higher level than we truly are. If you are sitting more than you think you should be, consider that there just might be more to learn.

Related: Delusions of Competence & The Lead is Not a Ride.

An Alvin Ailey dancer showing the power and exquisite beauty of phenomenal technique.

 

About Epiphany

epiphanies on life and spiritual living as I chase wisdom - one insight at a time.

Posted on July 18, 2017, in Dance and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Alessandro Moro

    Dear Epiphany, your writing here is so wise and true! If I may I would share my personal experience.
    Since any of us has its own body and way of moving, I turned to individual lessons so to suite the class to every day exercise and follow an effective program. No progress With no every day exercise. Like any discipline. To me crucial is not having a same state of mind partner, so part of exercise is not possibile. Attending The Practica is the refinement and testing. I look for suggestions and comments. Thank you.

    Like

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